43 Anmerkungen
30 September
Reblog

funkies:

HAVENT HAD A BAE WHO I LUVED IN A WHILE.

I need luv it fuels my energy even tho most of them got me fucked up in numerous ways 

[ 10038 ]
— 28 September
► Reblog

devoutfashion:

Yaya Deng For Yen Magazine by Renee Carey

[ 86211 ]
— 28 September
► Reblog

actual-drawings:

nahnichan:

『80年のダイジェスト』

oh god his vines are best

(Quelle: vine.co)

[ 21988 ]
— 06 September
► Reblog
Twin Size Mattress by The Front Bottoms
85.959 Mal abgespielt

societycalls:

The Front Bottoms//Twin Size Mattress- Studio acoustic Version 

It’s no big surprise you turned out this way.

When they close their eyes and prayed you would change
And they cut your hair, and sent you away
You stopped by my house the night you escaped
With tears in my eyes, I begged you to stay
You said, “Hey man, I love you but no fucking way”

[ 677 ]
— 31 August
► Reblog
[ 8972 ]
— 26 August
► Reblog
"

And if Michael Brown was not angelic, I was practically demonic. I had my first drink when I was 11. I once brawled in the cafeteria after getting hit in the head with a steel trash can. In my junior year I failed five out of seven classes. By the time I graduated from high school, I had been arrested for assaulting a teacher and been kicked out of school (twice.) And yet no one who knew me thought I had the least bit of thug in me. That is because I also read a lot of books, loved my Commodore 64, and ghostwrote love notes for my friends. In other words, I was a human being. A large number of American teenagers live exactly like Michael Brown. Very few of them are shot in the head and left to bake on the pavement.

The “angelic” standard was not one created by the reporter. It was created by a society that cannot face itself, and thus must employ a dubious “morality” to hide its sins. It is reinforced by people who have embraced the notion of “twice as good” while avoiding the circumstances which gave that notion birth. Consider how easily living in a community “with rough patches” becomes part of a list of ostensible sins. Consider how easily “black-on-black crime” becomes not a marker of a shameful legacy of segregation but a moral failing.

"
— Ta-Nehisi Coates, being amazing. (via politicalprof)
[ 403 ]
— 12 August
► Reblog
vanrobinson:

Orange, CA

vanrobinson:

Orange, CA

(Quelle: vanrobinson.net)

[ 4263 ]
— 12 August
► Reblog
lostinphotographywonderland:
[ 4968 ]
— 12 August
► Reblog
tierradentro:

A fight at the Ukrainian Parliament transformed into a Caravaggio-like painting… that’s why we love the internet. :-D
(Photo credit: Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters)

tierradentro:

A fight at the Ukrainian Parliament transformed into a Caravaggio-like painting… that’s why we love the internet. :-D

(Photo credit: Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters)

[ 46731 ]
— 12 August
► Reblog
"

Most girls are relentlessly told that we will be treated how we demand to be treated. If we want respect, we must respect ourselves.

This does three things. Firstly, it gets men off the hook for being held accountable for how they treat women. And secondly, it makes women feel that the mistreatment and sometimes outright violence they face due to their gender is primarily their fault. And thirdly, it positions women to be unable to speak out against sexism because we are made to believe any sexism we experience would not have happened if we had done something differently.

I cannot demand a man to respect me. No more than I can demand that anybody do anything. I can ask men to be nice to me. But chances are if I even have to ask he does not care to be nice. I can express displeasure when I’m not being respected. But that doesn’t solve the issue that I was disrespected in the first place.

I can choose to not deal with a man once he proves to be disrespectful and/or sexist. But even that does not solve the initial problem of the fact that I had to experience being disrespected in the first place.

As a young girl, I wish that instead of being told that I needed to demand respect from men that I had been told that when I am not respected by men that it’s his fault and not mine. But that would require that we quit having numerous arbitrary standards for what it means to be a “respectable” woman. It would mean that I am not judged as deserving violence based on how I speak, what I wear, what I do, and who I am.

"